Author Elaine A. Powers Featured on Tucson Environmental Community Partners

Elaine A. Powers was recently featured on Tucson Environmental Community Partners. This felicitous editorial aligns with Elaine’s aim as an author, conservationist, and biologist to spread science and fun through her stories.

Tucson Environmental Community Partners’ mission is to share the ‘purpose and passion’ of Tucson environmentalist residents, enthusiasts, professionals, educators, business owners, and volunteers.

The group touts Elaine’s “refreshing approach to teaching kids about reptiles & land conservation.” And while they love the fact that “Elaine does not shy away from scientific Latin names to identify the animals,” they also call her books “humorous’ and “leave an impression in [children’s] minds.”

To read the article visit https://tucsonenvironmental.com/project/elaine-a-powers-author-biologist-conservationist/.

About Tucson Environmental Community Partners

Tucson Environmental Community Partners is a resource for Tucsonans to engage in the community of diverse events, activities, education, volunteerism, outdoor and eco-driven businesses, and to locate many opportunities to participate and get involved in supporting and making practical, restorative, and powerful environmental change and care.

Elaine A. Powers’ science-based picture books featured in Big Blend’s Quality of Life Magazine. 

Read about Elaine’s path to becoming a science-focused author and learn about a few of her favorite books! 

Quality of Life Magazine focuses on family, lifestyle, personal development, and professional success. Of course, travel and the arts always have a way of sneaking into their publications too! This magazine is part of their 25th-anniversary expansion of turning Big Blend Radio & TV Magazine into 7 different themed publications, along with continuing to publish Parks & Travel Magazine. Reaching an average of 1.1 million reads per issue, all their magazines are published on Issuu.com and Calameo.com and are featured on their websites, in their Big Blend e-Newsletter, and on social media platforms. 

You can find the entire issue, including Elaine’s feature here: https://blendradioandtv.com/listing/quality-of-life-magazine-spring-summer-2022/

Cayman Illustrator featured in Cayman Compass

Simone Scott illustrator of Fly Back to the Brac, Brian Brown Booby was recently featured in the Cayman Island’s most trusted news source, Cayman Compass, as well as the Autumn/Winter 2021 issue of InsideOut magazine. 

As a Cayman Brac resident and talented artist, Simone was the perfect choice for Elaine’s book featuring the Grand Cayman’s Brown Boobies. 

Read the full article: Simone’s slice-of-life: Brac artist captures spirit of the Sister Islands.

 

Arizona Daily Star Book Review: Squirrels of the Sonoran Desert

“Elaine Powers, a former laboratory biologist, is living her retirement dream writing science-based picture books for children. Tortoises, rattlesnakes, and even the Night-blooming Cereus have all been grist for her mill. With this latest offering, inspired by a suggestion from volunteer naturalists at Sabino Canyon, Powers takes on the challenge of explaining, in rhyme, the ground squirrel. There are three species of ground squirrels who call the Sonoran Desert home, and Powers tells us all about them, from their physical descriptions and habitat to their role in the desert ecosystem. Lively, often humorous, and sometimes downright startling illustrations by Anderson Atlas accompany the text. When the Peoria, Illinois transplant to Oro Valley takes a break from writing books for kids, Powers can be found penning murder mysteries. Ages 5 and up.”

Read the full review here!

Review by Helene Woodhams

Helene is retired from Pima County Public Library, where she was literary arts librarian and coordinator of Southwest Books of the Year, the library’s annual literature review.

Arizona Daily Star Book Review: Queen of the Night

“A perk of Sonoran-desert living is the one-night-only appearance of the Night-Blooming Cereus, a much-anticipated summer event for Tucsonans who rely on predictions from experts to know precisely when the tiny window of opportunity will open on the floral extravaganza. How in the world do the experts know? And what causes a cactus to behave this way?

With this picture book, Elaine Powers demystifies the mysterious bloom, explaining – in rhyming couplets no less – the life cycle of the plant, how to predict its flowering (when the buds reach 170-230 millimeters, stand back!), why they all flower simultaneously, and other bits of botanical lore about this intriguing plant, which spends most of the year looking like an undistinguished stick. Written for children, Powers’ book will charm and edify cactus lovers of any age. Lush illustrations by Nicholas Thorpe are a splendid accompaniment: Look for his very stern javelina on page 12 – he’s delightful.

A former laboratory biologist, Powers, who makes her home in Tucson, now writes science-based children’s books.”

– Reviewed by Helene Woodhams. Helene is retired from Pima County Public Library, where she was literary arts librarian and coordinator of Southwest Books of the Year, the library’s annual literature review.

Arizona Daily Star Book Review: Don’t Make Me Fly!

“What a curious creature the Roadrunner is! This iconic desert bird prefers hoofing it to flying, and its footprints are the same backward as they are forward. With vibrant illustrations by Nicholas Thorpe, this picture book is jam-packed with scientific facts about roadrunners, delivered in verse form to keep the narrative lively. Roadrunners “grab their victim behind its head And bash it on the ground until it’s dead.” Want to know how to swallow a horned lizard? Keep reading! Don’t Make Me Fly! is recommended for children in grades K-4.”

Read the full review here.

– Review by Helene Woodhams

Helene is retired from Pima County Public Library, where she was literary arts librarian and coordinator of Southwest Books of the Year, the library’s annual literature review.

Arizona Daily Star Book Review: Don’t Make Me Rattle!

“A rattle from a reptile is not a welcome sound, but if it makes you tread carefully, it’s served its purpose, says Tucson author Elaine A. Powers. In a picture book chock-full of rattlesnake facts, she emphasizes the good they do (eating rodents, scattering seeds, and aiding cancer research), as she imparts interesting reptilian lore. For instance, although toxic to those on the receiving end, venom acts like saliva for a rattlesnake, a necessary digestive aid since they lack teeth for chewing. And rattlers are surprisingly social creatures who bunk together when it’s cold–forming a ‘rhumba’ of rattlers. An unabashed rattlesnake fan, Powers bemoans how willingly we exterminate them, largely because they look so unlovable. She gets no argument there from illustrator Nicholas Thorpe, whose threatening rattlesnake pictures, some with mouths agape and dripping venom, are undeniably scary. The third in the “Don’t” series is for kids in grades K-4.”

Read the full review here.

– Review by Helene Woodhams

Helene is retired from Pima County Public Library, where she was literary arts librarian and coordinator of Southwest Books of the Year, the library’s annual literature review.