Horse Care, Sirens, and a Desert Singalong

One afternoon about 3:00 p.m., I heard sirens on a nearby main road.  The sirens went on for quite a while and included several pitches. The vehicles probably included those from the police and fire departments, and perhaps an ambulance. I listened as I brushed my horse, Button.

Photo of a Missouri Foxtrotter horse
Button, my 1000 pound friend!

She turned to listen to the noise, too–not that she hadn’t heard sirens before, but these did seem to be excessive.

Then, voices nearby were raised in a chorus that matched the pitches of the sirens! The large pack of coyotes in the area joined in the song. I usually hear the coyotes’ chorus at dawn or dusk, not mid-afternoon, but they added spontaneous flourishes and harmony to the sirens that midday. One ran up and down the scale in an amazing arpeggio. It was a magical choral moment.

They typically call to each other in greeting to help them stay in contact and reunite. On that afternoon, did they believe the sirens were pack members calling hello, or did they simply grab an opportunity to enjoy a musical interlude in the afternoon?

Book Note: I live in the Sonoran Desert and enjoy the wildlife immensely. I have written three books on Sonoran Desert wildlife, one for little ones about desert tortoises entitled Don’t Call Me Turtle; and two others for all ages, called Don’t Make Me Fly about roadrunners, and Don’t Make Me Rattle, about rattlesnakes. They are written in rhyme and vividly illustrated to make learning the science throughout fun.

These books make excellent gifts and can be used for school projects, too. Check out my ‘Don’t Series’ today.

July 15th is National I Love Horses Day (Or, Actually, I- Love-One-Particular-Horse- Day)

I didn’t like horses as a child. In fact, I didn’t particularly like them as an adult. However, I did enjoy touring the countryside and riding a horse was much easier than hiking it all. When I moved to Tucson, I liked riding though the Sonoran Desert, but I found that the stirrups hurt my aged knees.

A couple of my equestrian friends suggested I learn to ride bareback, which is how I met Button, a Missouri Fox-Trotter, who was one of my lesson horses. She had started her own lessons a month before I did, so we learned together.

photo taken from atop Button, a Missouri Fox-Trotter
Riding in the desert atop Button, the horse I do love

Little did I know that I would ever own a horse of my own. Little did I know that three years later, I would own Button! Up until the night before I was asked if I wanted her, I would have told you, no way was I ever going to have a horse. But Button chose me to be her human and I chose her to be my horse.

Even though I don’t love all horses, I do love this one particular horse, on National I Love Horses Day.

photo of author Elaine Powers with Button, a missiouri fox-trotter
Me, with my favorite horse!

Who knows? Button just may inspire me to write a book about her one day. But, in the meantime, I hope you’ll check out some of the fun science books for kids that I’ve written. Who say science has to be boring? Not me!

And, we’re all looking for ways to learn and grow at home now. Check out the incredible science workbooks at Lyric Power Publishing. They’re fun, educational, economical and you buy a workbook once and print it as many times as you’d like. Click on the image below to see all of them.

Collage of Science Education Workbooks
Click on Workbooks to see all 23 workbooks, making science education fun!